Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access

Classes

We Are Part of the College of Design Curriculum

CATEA faculty and researchers are an integral part of the curriculum at the College of Design. Center Director Jon Sanford is also a professor in the School of Industrial Design. In addition to specialty research and topical seminars,  Sanford and associated faculty teach graduate (ID 6800/Arch 8843) and undergraduate (ID 4210/Arch 4843) courses in Universal Design in the Built Environment in the fall and a graduate-level course (ID 8900), Universal Design Investigations and Applications, in the spring semester. Although these courses are primarily for architecture and industrial design students, they are often filled with students in human-computer interaction, biomedical engineering, and human factors psychology. The two courses will be part of the curriculum for an anticipated certificate program in Assistive and Interactive Technology Design.

CATEA faculty, researchers, and doctoral students are also frequent lecturers in many courses across campus including industrial design studios, human computer interaction, and psychology.

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings

ID 4210 / Arch 4843 - Intro to Universal Design in the Built Environment

Instructor: Jon Sanford

This is an undergraduate course that focuses on the basic issues that create the biggest impact on usability of the physical environment — the interaction between human ability (and dis-ability) and the design of places, products, and systems. This is a project-based, field research, and design course for undergraduate students to learn how to design for all individuals, regardless of ability. The focus of the course is on the usability of spaces, buildings, objects, and interfaces based on human ability. The student will develop an understanding of human ability and its importance in defining both disability and usability.

Design experience is not a prerequisite for this course, and it is relevant and open to undergraduate students from all disciplines.

ID 6800/Arch 8843 – Advanced Universal Design: Investigations in the Built Environment

Instructor: Jon Sanford

This is a is a graduate course that focuses on the basic issues that create the biggest impact on usability of the physical environment — the interaction between human ability (and dis-ability) and the design of places, products and systems. This is a research-oriented, project-based course where graduate students will focus on the analysis of usability problems at all scales of design. The course emphasizes the acquisition of evidence-based methods to identify, understand, develop, and substantiate new design solutions for all individuals, regardless of ability.

Design experience is not a prerequisite for this course, and it is relevant and open to graduate students from all disciplines. The course will operate as a lecture and project-based class.

ID 8900 – Special Problems: Universal Design Investigation and Applications

Instructor: Jon Sanford

This project-based, research-oriented course provides students with an opportunity to apply universal design. The course will emphasize the acquisition of evidence-based methods through field trips and engagement of users and other stakeholders. Based on an understanding of user needs and abilities, students will apply the principles of universal design to develop innovative design solutions. Different design challenges are addressed each semester through client-driven real world projects in the Atlanta area.

ID 8900 – Special Problems: Design for Public Health

Instructor: Sarah Melgen

This course will explore the intersection of design and public/community health. It looks at the relevance of designing for social impact and learning how to approach design in order to improve a population’s health — internationally and domestically. The course will be taught through case studies ranging from global organizations to projects that have been created and nurtured here at Georgia Tech.

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